MURA MASA // Love$ick (Four Tet Remix)

 

 

Serious heat! Incredible collaboration; Just need BBNG now…

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Steve Lehman. Are You In Peace

Lehman’s music has always drawn from disparate sources in distinctive ways, but with Sélébéyone, he takes an unexpected turn: drawing, from modern jazz, Senegalese rap, live electronics, and underground hip-hop, to create a unique form of urban experimentalism. The project stands apart from almost every other jazz/hip-hop collaboration that has preceded it: this is not an album where live musicians imitate repetitive samples in 4/4 time. Instead, the musical elements – shifting rhythms, electro-acoustic harmonies, and contemporary sound design – are wholly integrated with the lyrical content. Add to that the unique juxtaposition of English and Wolof that permeates the record, and one gets the sense of the development of a whole new musical universe.

And though the music on Sélébéyone may seem like a radical departure from Lehman’s more recent ensemble work, it is actually the product of his long-standing engagement with experimental hip-hop and its surrounding community. Lehman’s critically-acclaimed octet has released arrangements of seminal hip-hop tracks, like Wu-Tang Clan’s “Living In the World Today” and Camp Lo’s “Luchini.” And his professional ties with Meshell Ndegeocello and other pioneering members of the contemporary R&B community date back to 2004: most recently Lehman was a featured soloist on Ndegeocello and Jason Moran’s 2014 Blue Note release All Rise.

De La Soul. Anonymous Nobody

The wait is finally over. For De La Soul fans, especially those that have been there since the trio’s seminal album, 1989’s 3 Feet High and Rising, the news of De La Soul’s ninth studio album coming to fruition was like a dream come true. After raising over $600,000 through a Kickstarter campaign, they had more money to make an album than they’ve ever had before. The question is: Did it help or hinder?
In many ways, De La Soul’s long-awaited and the Anonymous Nobody is not really a De La Soul album. The classic trio take centerstage on their own on only five of the album’s 18 tracks. Granted, it was produced by the New Yorkers, but with over 10 features crowding the booth, the voices of Dave Jolicoeur, Kelvin “Posdnous” Mercer, and Vincent “Maseo” Mason often drown in the deluge. On “Drawn”, for example, Swedish dream pop groupLittle Dragon overpower, the vocal contributions from De La Soul confined to a 30-second window.
de-la-soul-anonymous-nobody

Romare. Love Songs: Part Two

Archie Fairhurst, aka Romare, gets amorous with his second album. A kind of follow-up or development of his second ever release, a four track EP entitled “Love Songs: Part One”, “Love Songs: Part Two”, explores every nook and cranny of the romantic impulse from dirty sex to religious fervour across ten tracks which develop and expand upon the casual brilliance of his debut, “Projections”, establishing him as one of the most exciting, confident and distinctive producers in electronic music right now.
Release. 11th November 2016

The Avalanches. Wildflower

To listen to the Avalanches is to wrestle with time. The sample-rich music made by this group of Australian DJs makes you think about where its pieces come from, what those fragments meant to you then, and what they mean to you embedded into the group’s finished songs. There’s nostalgia and loss ingrained in every bar, and you can sense the erratic movement of past, present, and future from the first listen.
Speaking of time, there’s also the fact that the Avalanches waited 16 years to follow up their debut album, 2000’s landmark Since I Left You. To be a fan of the Avalanches, you had to be patient. Some of the delay was to be expected. Their first record was said to have thousands of samples, but you never can tell with a figure like that—let’s just agree that it contained a lot. And working with samples means submitting yourself to a longer timetable. Because whileJarvis Cocker might pick up a guitar and write eight songs in two days, building music from other music means you have to do a lot of listening. Which means sampling artists spend a great deal of time engaged in the same activity as their audience—driving around with the radio on, poised by the turntable, dropping a needle, clicking around on YouTube, walking around with headphones. And there are no shortcuts. Throw in the usual long-delayed-album mix of bad equipment, poor health, perfectionism, and clearance issues, and who knows, maybe we’re lucky to get Wildflower, the first new Avalanches record in 16 years.