LOWELL FULSOM. The Thing

Psychedelic 60′s Northern Soul.
Instrumental.
The term Northern Soul was unheard of by black America until it was created at the turn of the 60’s into the 70’s by British elders who witnessed a fast dance style to up-tempo Soul. Yes, the singers and bands made the sound but it was most definitely labeled NS in the UK.
Northern soul is a music and dance movement that emerged independently inNorthern England, theEnglish Midlands,Scotland and Wales[1] in the late 1960s from the British mod scene. Northern soul mainly consists of a particular style ofblack American soul music based on the heavy beat and fast tempo of the mid-1960s Tamla Motown sound.
The northern soul movement, however, generally eschews Motown or Motown-influenced music that has had significant mainstream commercial success. The recordings most prized by enthusiasts of the genre are usually by lesser-known artists, released only in limited numbers, often by small regional American labels such as Ric-Tic and Golden World Records(Detroit), Mirwood (Los Angeles) and Shout and Okeh (New York/Chicago).
Northern soul is associated with particular dance styles and fashions that grew out of the underground rhythm & soul scene of the late 1960s at venues such as the Twisted Wheel inManchester. This scene and the associated dances and fashions quickly spread to other UK dancehalls and nightclubs like the Chateau Impney (Droitwich), Catacombs (Wolverhampton), the Highland Rooms atBlackpool Mecca, Golden Torch (Stoke-on-Trent) and Wigan Casino.
As the favoured beat became more uptempo and frantic, by the early 1970s, northern soul dancing became more athletic, somewhat resembling the later dance styles of disco and break dancing. Featuring spins, flips, karate kicks and backdrops, club dancing styles were often inspired by the stage performances of touring American soul acts such as Little Anthony & The Imperials and Jackie Wilson.
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